Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Hello. I'm Dr. Lisa Belisle and you are listening to, or watching, Radio Maine. Today, it's my pleasure to have Rick Hamilton with me, again, Rick Hamilton. It's great to see you. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Thank you. Good to see you too. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Rick. I just love your pieces. I mean, I think I would, if I had another house, I would just have a whole house full of Rick Hamilton pieces. Like the people, just the pieces make me happy. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Oh, that's great to hear. Thank you. I think that's an excellent idea too, by the way. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Okay. All right. I'm gonna, I'll, I'll work on that with my husband, Kevin, and we'll see what we could do all build the whole house just for Rick Hamilton's, but let's start with talking about the piece that's right behind us. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

This is one that I literally just finished maybe an hour or so ago.  it's probably still wet with paint.  I've been painting a lot of lobstermen lately and I've, well, I've done that for a couple years, but I've recently started adding more of the actual lobsters into the paintings too. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Yeah. And what's fun about this too, is I think people who live in Maine or have seen actual live lobsters know that lobsters are not red.

 

Rick Hamilton:

Correct. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Until they are dead. And in this case, you actually have a live lobster. It's blue, but not everybody would know that that, that they are closer to a blueish kind of darkish blue shade. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah, that's true. And I haven't called out on that actually, because mostly when I paint the lobsters, I paint them red and people will say, how can he hold them, how can he be holding a boiling lobster? 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

So do you say, well, he's obviously at a lobster bake. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

I say nothing. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Okay. You just say, listen, this is art. We're gonna let you just use your own interpretations. Exactly. Yeah. Well, I actually really enjoy this and also I can smell the paint. So that makes me realize how fresh this really is, like, right, right off the right off the easel. Where is the cat? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Well do you want me to tell you, or do you want to cut? 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

I can find the last one. That's the thing. I mean, it lit, it literally bothered me. I would go by the last time, the painting that we talked about, you said there's a cat in there and I, I would keep going by keep going by. Could not ever find it. Let me, let me look for just a second here. Yeah. All right. Tell you what, okay. I, I'm not gonna ask you to show me now because I'm gonna want people to actually go to the gallery or go online to find this painting and see if they can find it. But before you leave today, I'm gonna ask you to show me the cat because otherwise it's gonna keep bothering me. And maybe my, my, my eyes just aren't as yeah, yeah. But this is still a motif that you used. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

It is. Yeah. Yeah. I think it started, I'm gonna guess maybe six years ago. I did a painting of a man playing guitar, and I imagined him in a port of Italy or Spain. And there were some sailboats in the background and in the foreground were some bigger cats and it was called Seren, the cats, and this guy was playing guitar to these feral cats. And somehow from that, I developed this idea that I'd hide a little kitty in every painting. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And do you actually have cats yourself? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

No, no cats. Nope. I don't mind them, but I'm slightly allergic to 'em so I can't, I couldn't have a cat. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

So you, you are using these cats as a hypoallergenic means of bringing them into your life. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

That that's exactly what it 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

 just buy a rec Hamilton painting and you will have a cat at your home, whether you'll be able to actually find the cat or not. I don't really know, but I will make assumptions that other people don't have the kind of brain that one needs. Yeah. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Okay. Sure. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Okay. All right. You are doing interesting things these days. One of which is onsite painting in pretty large format. Tell me about the most recent experience you had with this. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

All right. That was actually in the Portland art gallery. And it was a painting that was six foot by 10 foot, which is now the biggest painting I've ever done either in a studio or, or anywhere actually. So that's my biggest one. And it really came about in such an organic way with Kevin and I talking about some ideas that we, that we could throw out you know, just to shake things up a little bit. And Kevin had the idea of, maybe you could just sit, do a gallery sitting and we could have some of your paintings out and just talk to clients on a, maybe on a Saturday afternoon. And I said, it's a great idea. And then I thought about the idea of if I'm gonna do that, maybe I can just paint a painting there. And he loved that idea. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

And then later in the day, this was, this all started on a Monday. Okay. Later in the day he called me and said, there's an, there's an opportunity for a big painting at the store. Aristelle right around the corner from the gallery. And would you be interested in putting a PA a big painting in there? I said, I'd love to do that. And then I think late towards the end of that day, we're still on Monday. Now. He said, how about this? Why don't you paint that big painting in the gallery? I said, that's a, I love it. So it just happened so quickly and organically that it, that it was really, it was really special. And then on Tuesday now, now we're on Tuesday. Okay.  he said, how quick can you have I had to, I would've had to build the canvas myself. He said, how quickly could you have it ready? And I said, ah, maybe a week now we're on Tuesday. He said, how about you bring it to the gallery Thursday morning and you start. Then I said, sure. So I scrambled and I found a carpenter buddy, and we built it on Wednesday and drove it to the gallery Thursday morning. And I started maybe half an hour after we got in there. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And how long did it take you to finish that piece? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

The piece was for four days.  There was a little bit of sitting around and a little bit of talking with the clients that came in, but it, but it was four days of painting. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

How did people respond most of the time when you walk into an art gallery, you, you know, you're kind of, you're kind of ticking a look at things on the wall and wondering how it might look in your living room and here you are a real live artist doing a real live painting in the middle of all of this and really bringing art to life. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Mm. Yeah, it was, it was slow to start because I think people would come in the gallery and when they would come into the second room where I was painting they would pause because they would feel that they were interrupting something and they, they weren't sure if they could, should come in, even though there were signs up saying, go see the artist and talk to 'em. People were just a little bit worried that they would be interrupting me. So what I did is the first morning I wrote, I painted on the, on, on the canvas itself. I said, please talk to the artist and people would see that and they'd giggle. And then that would make them come in a little bit and and, and open up. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And do I understand that there were some children that were intrigued by the work you were doing? Yeah. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah, there was.  So I had this plan when we started that I might have people write on the back of the canvas, maybe their name or where they're from, just to indicate that, that they were there and part of the process.  but I decided against that because I had this vision of maybe the pencil poking through the canvas. I said, ah, that's probably not a good idea. But I think the first group of visitors that we had there were two or three adults, maybe two or three kids. And they, we, we were just talking about the process a little bit. All I, all I had done at this point was throw some colors on the canvas just to get a feel for how it was gonna operate and that's and stuff like that. But one of the little girls said to her mom, after we talked for maybe 15 minutes, she said, mom, I really want to go home and paint now. And I thought about painting on this canvas. So I grabbed the brush and I said, and I think I grabbed the color yellow, the jar of yellow. I said, paint on this. And she started painting on the canvas. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Wow. Yeah. So this could be future fellow artists that you have just initiated the career of. Yeah. That's kind of a nice feeling, isn't 

 

Rick Hamilton:

It? It was amazing. And to bring this whole story around, I, I realized that not a, maybe I inspired a fellow artist and also I was inspired. The reason why I painted for the very first time was that a 10 year old girl on Munjoy hill was painting outside our apartment. And I asked her what she was doing. And she said, I'm just painting. Do you wanna paint with me? And I said, sure. So I painted, and that's what spur what brought on the love of painting for me, 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

It is interesting how the world is kind of, it brings things back around. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

It really does. Yep. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Rick, I know a lot of the pieces that you've painted are focused on kind of coastal Mediterranean scenes.  and I've also seen that you have evolved your work to include scenes that are closer to home. Is this something that kind of, you were inspired by the fact that we live in Maine, you're gonna start doing this now. Is there something else that kind of kicks this off for you? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Well, I do. I love Maine and I love all the scenes in Maine and I get to see the ocean every day in Maine.  and I've always wanted to paint scenes of Maine. I just, there's a certain, I don't know about stubbornness that I have where I just have to feel that the time is right for me. And I can't, I, I just can't force it to happen. And this past couple years, I guess the time was just right for me to start doing it. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And was there in any way related to having to kinda hunker down a little bit more as a result of the pandemic? Or was it just something that you can't even describe just that caused you to move in that direction?

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah, I think it's more, the latter something I really can't describe. I, I don't think that the pandemic had a lot of influence on my art if, if it had any influence, I think it made it a little brighter and happier. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

So almost as a response to the pandemic, you kind of went in the other direction. 

 

Rick Hamilton: Yep. I yep. I believe I did. Yeah. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Well, that's very interesting.  So when you're thinking about a piece, just let's look at this piece behind us. What is this one called? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

This one called is called catch me if you can.

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Catch me. Okay. Well that makes sense. Cause that's what it says on the sleeve is I did catch yes. Good. That's very good branding on your wire. so tell me about what got you to the place where you said, oh, I think I'm gonna do this piece. It's gonna have three people who are lobster people, cuz I don't know whether they're male or female, possibly male, hard to say, but what, what caused you to start painting this piece when you did. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

There's something about the lobstermen series all started with, with the idea of these orange overalls? I, I just love this orange color and there's something about that. That orange on their overalls that really attracted me to, to the painting of, to start painting the lobstermen. And I was a lobsterman for a short time. I don't know if that had a lot of effect or inspiration on me, but maybe it did.  I only lasted about two weeks. That is not my thing. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

No, why not? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

It's way too hard of a job. It's too hard.  but so I'm not sure what started the inspiration for the lobsterman, but I really just love painting the orange and it gives me a really good excuse to do that. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Yeah. Yeah. I can see that. So how did you get into being a lobsterman and then how did you decide? Oh Nope. Two weeks. That's enough. Yeah. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Well I've done, I've had a ton of different careers before I was an artist.  and that was just one of the many things that I tried doing. Yeah. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And  apparently all of them are easier than being a lobsterman. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

That was one of the toughest. Yep. Yep. That was one of the toughest ones. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Yeah. Yeah. I'm, I'm always impressed where we live because many people stop pulling traps and then, you know, they only do it again in the summertime, but there are a fair number of people who are pulling traps as long and late into the season as they possibly can. And kind of, as soon as the temperature lifts a little bit, and we're far enough into the spring, they're back out there again and they're out there every morning and I mean, you're just exposed to all the elements. So yeah, it is a lot of very hard work yeah. Which is kind of interesting that you are , I guess, shining a light on these people that do this very hard work, which probably they wouldn't be able to have the time in their lives to paint themselves. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

True. Yeah. And there's something about people that really work hard and are dedicated to something like that. Even like you talk about these, these people that do this during the winter, like that's gotta, that seems so intense to me, but they, every day they're out there doing it and I paint a lot of lobstermen and I paint a lot of dancers and I'm really impressed with the, the work ethic that a dancer has. And that all started when I was, I did a draw, a dance session where a dancer would come in and do poses and we would, we would just draw her. And I think the final pose she did was 20 minutes of just one position and I was just blown away. And the more I looked into it, I realized that these dancers worked so hard at their art and their craft and it really impressed me. And that translated into me doing a series on dancers too. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

That's very interesting. What is it about this work ethic that somehow appeals to you? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

I don't know.  I do, sometimes I say I'm, I'm a lazy person, but in actuality, like I've been, I've done careers that have been really hard work and, and I've succeeded at him.  so I do have a really good work ethic and I bring that into the studio.  Even though painting is not a physically tough job for me, I'm in the studio for a long, long time.  so I bring that work ethic into the studio. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Well, and even what you're describing, as far as the process of getting you to the place where you were painting in the Portland art gallery, your willingness to kind of turn on a dime and say, yep, this I'm happy to do it. I know this is part of, you know, putting my work out there, let's figure out a way to do it, work with my carpenter friend, create what I need to in order to make the logistics work. I mean, I think that that speaks to that, that willingness to put yourself out there and the understanding that being an artist requires quite a bit of effort. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Mm true. Yeah, really does. Yep. And I think maybe my willingness to do that could stem from the work history that I've had. I don't, I didn't come into art in a traditional way.  I never went to art school or, or had any training.  So maybe that work ethic speaks to my willingness to say yes and try new things. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Yeah. And if you've had to kind of teach yourself and be flexible along the way and have all these various different jobs, you're probably continually putting yourself in a space of learning and figuring things out and giving yourself the time to figure things out. I think a lot of people, they just wanna be really good at something and they wanna be really good at something right away. And then when they aren't and maybe I'm speaking of myself actually, but, but then when they aren't, you know, it's easy to get discouraged and go, well, I wasn't good at that right away. So I'm just not gonna do it anymore. But what you're describing is sort of this beginner's mind that is often spoken about, but also persistence. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

True. Yep. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

So as you're working on something like this do, is there a, is there a waiting for the paint to dry, put the next layer on waiting for the paint to dry, put the next layer on and tell me a little bit about your process. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah, there is. And I'm very impatient, especially when I paint. So if I put down a layer of orange and I need it to dry quicker, I'll hit it with a heat gun because I don't even want to wait long enough for the paint to dry naturally. And if I lay down a red and I just say, mm, that's just not the right red for this painting again, I'll hit it with a heat gun and then go over it with what I, whatever I think it should, would, should cover it. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Isn't that dangerous? I mean, isn't there the possibility you're putting heat on a flammable 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Sure. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Substance on top of something that is also like a canvas, I feel like that could actually burst into flame itself. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah. I have, there have been times where I've held the heat gun on a little bit too much, and I see the smoke coming from the back of a canvas and that's pretty much the end of, of that canvas. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Oh my goodness. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Sometimes I don't know if you can see on this particular one, but if I hold the heat gun a little bit too long on it, the paint will start to bubble. And I really love that effect, especially after I sand over it, because whatever's underneath that bubbling once I sand will come out. So there could be specs of whatever is underneath. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

That's a fascinating observation that getting yourself that close to the edge of destruction and somehow yielding things that are unexpectedly wonderful. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:  

There's another piece that you brought in today that will show for people who are watching online.  and this is a main piece and it also has words. It says mainly, we love you. This very much is about buildings, as opposed to this piece that we're looking at behind us, which is about people. Do you do a lot of buildings in your, in the works that you do?

 

Rick Hamilton:

I think I'm getting more comfortable with doing buildings.  again, I just, I have to just get them. I'm not a perfectionist in the sense of, like, I don't have to have a building look like it would in real life, but I just have to be comfortable with it enough within me to say this is good and I can keep going with this. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

So you're, you're starting to put buildings in that you actually like and are willing to have out there in the world. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Correct? Yeah. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

What about this large piece that was done for Aristelle? What, what was the subject matter of that? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

That was me on the line of Dan of the dancers. Yeah. And it was taken, there was a smaller piece. That's at the gallery too. Ashley, the owner of Aristelle saw the painting and said, I would, I love it. Let's do a bigger version of this. So while I was in the gallery painting, it kind of morphed a little bit into, it was just five women in like retro style bathing suits, but then it morphed into chorus line dancers and they put their arm, their arms around each other and each was kicking up leg. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

So does that happen also for you on a regular basis where you, you start with one idea and it kind of seems to move forward in a different direction over time.

 

Rick Hamilton:

All the time? Yep. Yep. I did try because Ashley saw the original painting. I kind of felt like I had to stick to that just a little bit, but if I was in my studio that could have turned out to be lobstermen or buildings or a cow there's, there's no telling if each piece does move.  very rarely do I, will I sketch out a painting and have that be the finished product. It'll just move. And I paint over things,  and make changes. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

You also do commissions for people, and I know the commissions can be a little tricky because you're trying to take what's in somebody else's mind and translate it for them onto the canvas, but in a way that also feels good to you. So tell me about some of the successes that you've had.

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah. I look at it as a commission as almost a collaboration. I'll take input from the client and then start with something and then I'll finish the painting and then send the picture to them. And oftentimes they might say, well, could it be more blue or less blue or whatever, or whatever they feel. And I'm very open to making changes.  cuz I really believe that the more time I spend on a canvas and the more changes I make to it, the better it will be. And so I'm very open to changes as long as it's something that I'm comfortable with. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle: 

So what would be an example of something that you're not comfortable with? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Someone wanted me to do a painting of a person that was really large. And as you can see, like me, the people are pretty skinny and I don't think there's anything realistic about how someone could not have an arm that size with a body like that. It just is, but it works in my paintings. So this person wanted a painting of someone that's really large. And I tried it a little bit, but I said, I just can't do it.

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Yeah. That's true. If I'm thinking about the works that I've seen you do, I'm they, they don't have a lot of kind of, I guess, breadth to them. No, they are more vertical in nature. So I guess it would make sense that if you are kind of working in the style, you normally work in putting a completely different shape into the middle of a piece that you're doing probably would not feel great. 

 

Rick Hamilton: Mm true. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle: So what about people who ask to do things like a combination of buildings and figures? Cuz I, I see that you have kind of on one side of us, we have the figures and on the other side of us, we have the buildings, I've seen a few of your pieces that have a little bit of both, but they typically are more like one or the other. Have you had successes with those? 

 

Rick Hamilton:  

That's kind of a new thing for me. Like it's always been, the figures are front and center, just popping out of the painting recently. I've been trying to do some things where maybe make the figures smaller and put them into a landscape or some sort of a scene. So that is a new thing that I'm working on. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And what are the challenges associated with doing that? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Just doing something that I'm not so comfortable with doing, it's very like this scene right here is very comfortable to me and I can do it all. I love to do it. It's in, it's what I do. Putting, making the figures or the characters smaller and putting them in a scene is a little bit new and that makes it a little uncomfortable for me. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And why is that? Is it because the perspective is different? The style is different. What is it that makes it uncomfortable? 

 

Rick Hamilton:  

just because it is a new thing for me. Yeah. And I just have to, I I'm, I just have to kind of get it not exactly right. But just write enough for me. And it's just taking some time to get used to painting a smaller person and how that fits into the painting. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Well, and it's also interesting as I'm hearing you talk, because again, it's not that you're against learning how to do new things. You're more than happy to learn how to do new things, but it doesn't mean that you love it. It means you're willing to go through the discomfort of trial and error, I guess. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yes. Yeah. That's true.  And I go, it's almost like when I, when I do something new in painting, I'll have this it's, it's a really rollercoaster time in the studio. It'll start off with me thinking, oh my goodness, this is gonna be a great painting. This might be the best painting I've ever done. And then something won't go quite right in the painting. And then I go down the road, this is horrible. What am I doing, Rick? This isn't what you paint. You can't be doing this. And then something will shift and then it'll go back to, wow, Rick, this is really good. This is gonna be great. And then it just goes up and down like that. And if the painting lands where I think it will, it's just kind of a place where, okay, you're good on this one. Let's go to the next one. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

I actually really love hearing this because I do think that there are some people who are just very even keeled all the time. And then there are some people in their work that definitely go from one extreme to the next and it can be very disconcerting to be one of those people. I happen to be one of those people more in my creative side than my professional medical side. Thank goodness for my patients. But, but I think that it's, it's nice to hear that, you know, it's just not always possible to maintain balance and also be creative. It just takes comfort with sometimes not feeling great, sometimes feeling really great. So when you are working with people that you're doing a commission with, are typically people who bring you something and say, I would like you to paint a picture of my dog or I need something that fits over my mantle. I mean, how does that usually come about? 

 

Rick Hamilton:  

Sometimes it is based on size, like, like, like to fit over a mantle, usually not of a certain thing, like not a dog or even a relative or, or usually not something like that. It's more of an idea like, Ooh, I love the lobsterman. Could you do it with more pink in it? And then sometimes size does, does go into it. But I guess it's more based on color than subject. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And given that many artists do not like commissions.  Why do you think that you're so willing to try to make these things work? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Well, I think because I've said many times that one of the main reasons I make art is to connect with people and the connections that have been made through art are just, just mind boggling to me. It's just amazing. So if I do a commission that promotes a conversation about art, that's why I do it. So I re I just, I love it. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Which is also great because again, and, and I'm not saying that there a different one sort of artist is better than another sort of artist, but I do know that some artists are also fairly solitary. That's actually very uncomfortable for them to enter for them to interact with the public. But I know that you happen to be quite comfortable with people going to your studio, kind of visiting and seeing your creative process. And so, the kind of spectrum of people who engage in creative work has been very interesting to note as I've, you know, had conversations like this one. Mm. And for you, it almost sounds like bringing the art into it is just kind of another part of the conversation. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

That's right. Yeah. It's just maybe a spark to a conversation or a beginning. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Do you have people who will send you photos after they've taken one of your pieces and put it in their home and, and send it along to you and say, Hey, this is where this, this is where this landed. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Mm. Yeah. I love to see those photos. I do. I recently got a photo of a painting that was sold a few years ago and the client just had a baby and this little baby Crosby would just stare at my painting. And I, I think the BA I think Crosby was like a couple months and he would just look at the painting. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

So you're, you've, you're creating conversations. You're even your age group, moving downward. 

 

Rick Hamilton: 

We're talking like two or three months, 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Which, I mean, again, I think this is just wonderful because you're, you're creating connections with little human beings that are they're preverbal even.

 

Rick Hamilton:

That's right.

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And that, and that actually makes a lot of sense when I'm thinking about even some of the imagery that I have in my mind from when I was growing up. I mean, even before I had words to put around things, I can remember things that were in the rooms nearby. Right. Do you ever use that type of imagery when you are working? I mean, pieces that are not necessarily subjects that aren't necessarily right in front of you, like a scene from Portland, but things that you have experienced previously in your life? 

 

Rick Hamilton:

I don't think consciously I do that, but I think that there's no way that my life experiences can't come into my work. I don't, but I don't make a conscious effort to bring those experiences I had into the work. But they, they have to be there.

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Like the cats.

 

Rick Hamilton:

Like the cats. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Yeah. So tell me what you're excited about in the upcoming year, as far as your art is concerned or really anything. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah. Yeah. Well, I'm just excited that I'm part of the Portland art gallery. I love to work with them and we have a great back and forth relationship. I wanna try some new things. I'm starting to put some more abstract elements into my art. I'd like to make some purely abstract pieces. I have a little bit of trouble with that because I get so attached to what is the story behind the painting that with the abstract art, I feel like I have to let that go a little bit.  but I'm excited to try some just pure abstract pieces.

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

And what will those be related to? 

because they're abstract. Well, I'm just thinking some people, when they do their abstract pieces, they are thinking about landscape for example, or seascape. But in your mind you haven't worked that out yet. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

All right. Let me backtrack a little bit. I have just worked it out just a little bit. Like maybe I take these lobstermen and make them use these colors and shapes in an abstract piece. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Oh, I see what you're saying. Okay. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

So I have put a little bit of thought into it. Not too much. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

Okay. Well, that'll give us something to talk about the next time you come back. Absolutely. To be on the show. And I still cannot find the cat. Right. But I, but I I'm gonna make everybody I not make I'm anybody else who would like to try to find the cat. I will give them the opportunity to do that on their own with this piece, catch me if you can, and any of your other pieces. And then after we get off the air, we'll have our own conversation around this sounds good. So it doesn't torment me indefinitely. I have enough other things that we do, I believe it. Yes. Right. All right. Well, I really enjoyed our conversation today. And I think, again, I'm, I'm looking forward to having my own little Rick Hamilton house. That's gonna be filled with Rick Hamilton artistic pieces, because I think you're right. It is like having a story nearby, cuz every time you walk by a piece that you've created, you're, you're putting yourself with the lobstermen or on the coast of France or one of these other places. And it's just a, it's a really wonderful place to exist in. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Yeah. Thank you. 

 

Dr. Lisa Belisle:

I've been speaking with artist Rick Hamilton, and I encourage you to go to the Portland art gallery to see his work or go online to see his work or show up and  meet him in person. Maybe I'll even give you a studio tour. So many different options go to Aristelle. If you're looking to see what that eventually ended up looking like, regardless of how you connect with Rick Hamilton, he's really a wonderful human being. So I encourage you to do so. I'm Dr. Lisa Belisle, and this is radio name. Thanks for coming in today. 

 

Rick Hamilton:

Thank you.